Century-old Ti — Crop and garden report

This is the latest in a series of posts about news reported a century ago in the Ticonderoga Sentinel.

A lack of rain was threatening crops in the Ticonderoga area a century ago.

“Another draught,” the Crown Point correspondent reported in the Ticonderoga Sentinel on Sept. 1, 1921.

“Corn is gaining rapidly and is considered a good crop. Potatoes are a light crop and some fields show signs of blight,” the Ironville correspondent reported. “Pastures are drying up and rain is needed. Oats are reportedly a light crop where they have been threshed.”

Meanwhile, Sarah Pell’s flower garden at Fort Ticonderoga was flourishing.

The Sentinel recommended that residents visit the garden when it was open to the public on Saturdays.

“Quite a number took advantage of of Mrs. Pell’s invitation to visit her flower garden at the Fort last afternoon, and they were more than repaid,” the Sentinel reported. “With a profusion of flowers of all colors and variety, many of them rare in this locality, the gardens are a beauty spot that cannot be described in words.”

Local residents gave a share of the harvest from their vegetable gardens to Moses-Ludington Hospital.

Mrs. D.W. Mason donated squash, pumpkins, cucumbers and flowers.

Mrs. Ernest Whitcomb donated squash and beets.

Mrs. Joseph Arthur donated spinach.

Mrs. George Gabbard donated cucumbers and tomatoes.

In other Sept. 1 Ticonderoga Sentinel news:

  • The Essex County Fair at Westport had record single-day attendance of 8,000 on Aug. 29.

“With fine weather throughout the fair, the attendance was large every day.”

  • The employees of Silver Bay Association performed the 3-act play “Green Stockings” at the Ticonderoga Playhouse on Aug 30.

“The play had many funny situations that kept the audience, which was not as large as the merit of the show deserved, in almost constant laughter.”

  • Arthur and Forest Shepherd of Hague went to Glens Falls on Aug. 30 to watch the Ringling Brothers Circus.

Quotable

  • “Little joys refresh us constantly, like house-bread, and never bring disgust.”

Click here to read the most recent previous post in the series.

Freelance history writer and documentary film producer from Ticonderoga, NY